Wikia

Burn Wiki

Episode 108: Wanted Man

Comments0
290pages on
this wiki
Wanted Man
Season 1, Episode 8
Wanted-man
Air date August 16, 2007
Written by Craig O'Neill & Jason Tracey
Directed by Ken Girotti
Episode Guide
previous
Broken Rules
next
Hard Bargain
Wanted Man is the eighth episode of the first season and the eighth episode overall.

NotesEdit

SynopsisEdit

With Michael's assistance, Fiona helps a man who has been framed for the theft of an expensive broach.

Spy FactsEdit

  • Covert operatives have a hard time dating. Even if you find someone, who doesn't mind that you won't talk about your past, or that you carry a concealed weapon, they usually want more than you're able to give. 
  • Selling stolen goods is all about discretion. You've got to be the kind of person who can keep your mouth shut... the kind of person who never, ever shares the numbers in their little black book. 
  • Even the most careful spy leaves a trail that could get them burned. A patriot making illicit deals for his government looks a lot like a traitor, making black-market sales for his wallet. Somebody upstairs gets the wrong idea, and suddenly you're burned, and out of a job. 
  • When you're giving five inches, and a hundred pounds on a well trained opponent, it helps to know the terrain better than he does. 
  • A good cover identity is a team effort. If you want to meet someone, it's a good idea to play a little hard to get. Put people between yourself and the target. Make them come to you. 
  • Just because someone believes you are who you say you are, doesn't mean he'll do what you want him to do. 
  • Clandestine meetings are never fun to arrange. It's a big part of the job for a covert operative, but it's never pleasant... It's not so much the fear of death that bothers you, it's driving to the meet with a bag over your head. Sometimes they wash the bag, sometimes they don't. 
  • The thing about security is, that the very things that protect you, can be turned against you, by someone who knows what he's doing. It's tough to compromise a well thought out security system, but making someone think you can compromise it, well, that's much easier. Take surveillance cameras, for example, you can disable one by shooting a laser at it and overloading the light-sensitive chip. Cheap, easy, and exactly the sort of thing a sophisticated criminal gang, with lots of resources, would do. Leave around some tell-tale signs of surveillance like cigarette butts, a forgotten camera lens cap, and the more security there is, the more likely they are to think they've got a very serious problem. Even the security team itself can be an opportunity. The more employees you have, the more you have to worry about.
  • Deliver some vague threats, and a few hundred bucks to a security guard, if he's honest, he'll tell his boss, who then wonders who wasn't so honest. For the cost of a nice dinner, you can get a whole security team canned.
  • One of the dangers of any kind of psychological warfare, is it can be too effective, and send the target into a paranoid tail-spin. That paranoia can be useful... or deadly.
  • The key to good security, is good systems, consistency. But those very systems make you predictable. Where will you take your valuables? A bank you trust. How are you going to get there? With armed men in a big SUV. When will you go? When the bank is least crowded. All good procedure; all one hundred percent predictable.
  • If you know someone's going to be at a bank at a particular time, it's not hard to make it look like they're robbing the bank. Shoot out a few video security cameras. Block off the street with a stolen car, like they're preparing an escape route. Fire up a spark-gap transmitter to kill the security radios at the bank, and they'll really look like they know what they're doing.

Full RecapEdit

Covert operatives have a hard time dating. Even if you find someone who doesn't mind that you won't talk about your past, or that you carry a concealed weapon, they usually want more than you are able to give.

Michael arrives at Fiona's. She's making lunch and isn't happy to see that Michael has brought along the dossier acquired from Jason Bly. Chattily, she comments that she's surprised that the dossier is the only thing on his mind these days. Michael knows where this is headed. He tells Fiona that he knows they haven't discussed their lovemaking session the other night, but reminds her that there is a reason their relationship didn't work out the first time. Fiona blows this off... they were in a war zone then, this is Miami.

Arriving at the beach, Michael believes Fiona wants to enjoy the sun and sand, but she tells him she has a little errand to do first. She needs to bag a bail jumper, and has a tip he's at a nearby hotel. Michael is surprised, "You're a bounty hunter now, Fi?" Calmly she tells him a girl has to eat, confessing that she has been picking up odd jobs from a local bail bondsman. Michael starts to complain, and Fi pointedly asks him how often she has helped him with his various "errands." "All the time," he admits, and protests no further. She shows him the photo and name of her target, and Michael groans... the guy's name is spelled out on vanity plates on a nearby car. "Is it always this easy for you?" he complains. They head for the hotel where her man is supposed to be, only to see him run out the front door of the hotel, straight towards them.

Thomas McKee, fugitive and accused jewel thief, is falling in Fiona's lap. Unfortunately, he's being chased by a large man with a badge and a gun. Fiona knows the big guy, he is Wayne Ray, another bounty hunter, and admits that she might have angered Ray a bit by taking a few jobs out from under him in the past. She assigns Michael to the bounty hunter, taking the fugitive herself. Michael groans at the unfairness of this, but gives it his best effort, knocking the big guy down and attempting to detain him by faking injuries. Ray doesn't bite, getting up and remaining focused on his quarry.

McKee ducks down an alleyway and hides behind a dumpster. This fools Wayne Ray, but Fiona simply saunters up to McKee, pulling her gun. Putting him in flexible cuffs, as he vigorously protests his innocence, she stuffs him in Michael's back seat, and they pull away as Wayne Ray catches sight of the three. Michael asks Fiona where they are to deliver the fugitive. Fiona says he's going with them, since she believes he is innocent.

They take Thomas to Fiona's place. Michael points out that the purpose of bounty hunting is to turn the guy in and actually collect the bounty, $4,000.00 in this case. Thomas innocently examines Fiona's impressive collection of snow globes as the pair debate this course of action. Telling Thomas that she'd collected them through the years wherever she'd been 'working', she explains to Michael that Thomas is offering them double the promised bounty to prove his innocence.

Michael listens to the story: McKee had worked in South Beach doing liquor promotions. A few months earlier, a friend of his at the Victor showed him a huge diamond brooch the hotel was keeping in their safe for a guest. Michael questions why Thomas looked at the brooch. "Because it was worth two million bucks!" was his answer. The tale continues; the brooch was stolen, his friend was fired and he has been arrested and charged, as if he is some mastermind jewel thief (when anyone who spends five minutes in his company should know better). Michael points out that the cops had to have had more against Thomas than the fact that he'd looked at the thing. Thomas admits that he'd had an entry card to the hotel office for night deliveries, and he'd lost it. His card was used to gain access to the office, and thus the brooch. Michael clearly thinks Thomas is a fool: "And you went back to the scene of the crime....why?" Thomas says he was investigating. Michael tries to hide his amusement and contempt, Fiona is transfixed and smiling gently at Thomas. The fugitive finishes his tale. His trial was scheduled to start the previous day, and his lawyer had all but told him he would lose. He'd skipped court because he couldn't go to jail for anything, much less a crime he'd not committed.

"I wanna help him." Fiona states. "Do it for me, Michael." Faced with all Fiona has done to help him since he'd been burned - not to mention he is still figuring out the rules of being Fiona's official boyfriend - he agrees to assist Thomas. They discuss how to proceed. Fiona reminds Michael that with the police and other bounty hunters after Thomas, they need to stash him somewhere. Michael asks why he can't stay with Fiona. She asks casually if Michael has no problem with another guy staying over with her, he denies that it's a problem for him. Fiona looks calm and apparently has no issue with Michael's lack of jealousy.

Michael calls Sam, sending him to talk to Barry, their neighborhood money launderer. Barry says there is only one fence in Miami who would be able to handle a diamond that large, but warns Sam not to ask him for an introduction; Barry and the fence had some words in the past, and Barry lost a client as a result. Sam chuckles and says that if Barry provides the name, Michael will find the guy, and there might be a bit of satisfaction on the side for Barry over the guy's treatment at Michael's hands. Barry is intrigued, and the name is produced: Cristo.

Cristo, the fence, enters his apartment only to discover, a shade too late, that his security system has been disabled, wires dangling. Casually, Michael approaches from the rear, startling Christo, who draws his gun. Disarming Christo with ease, Michael drops him on his back and locks his arms behind him with a flexi-cuff. Frisking the fence, Michael pulls out his cell phone.

Selling stolen goods is all about discretion. You've gotta be the kind of person who can keep his mouth shut. The kind of person who never, ever shares the numbers in his little black book.

Michael selects a number at random and dials. Getting an answer, Michael pretends to be calling in desperate need of a place to hide from the cops, mentioning that Cristo gave him the number. The person on the other end hangs up quickly. Michael nonchalantly picks another number, commenting to Christo that he could keep doing this all night. Cristo asks Michael what he wants, knowing any continuation of this behavior will destroy his client base. When asked, he admits he'd been approached about the stolen brooch, adding that the guy was a "real amateur" who thought a 30 carat diamond could just be sold on the street (Barry had already advised Sam that such a large diamond could not be sold for months or years, while cutting it to avoid identification would slash the diamond's value).

Cristo said it would take at least six months to find a buyer.  It seems the 'owner' was none too happy to hear the sale might take so long; he needed quick cash. The fence thinks the guy is planning a business deal in Europe. Cristo has no name, but offers up a phone number. Michael casually mentions that he'd rifled through Cristo's refrigerator while he'd waited, flashing the huge diamond tennis bracelet he'd found in the orange sherbet, adding that he'll just hang onto it till his business with Cristo is complete - thereby avoiding a double-cross on Cristo's part.

Back at the apartment, Michael is still studying the dossier.

Even the most careful spy leaves a trail that could get them burned. A patriot, making illicit deals for his government looks a lot like a traitor, making black market sales for his wallet. Somebody upstairs gets the wrong idea, and suddenly you're burned and out of a job.

Sam enters the apartment, and seeing what has Michael occupied, advises him that no woman likes to be a distant second to a dossier, no matter how large the dossier. "You've been talking to Fi." Michael states. Sam says it's been more like listening to Fi. He does have a bit of information on the man who assembled the dossier, but it's slim. The man's name is Phillip Cowan, and he works for the National Security Agency's counter-intelligence division. That's all there is to know, Sam tells Michael the man is a ghost. Michael says he will simply have to find a way to reach out to the guy. Sam asks about the stolen jewel job, and Michael offers up the phone number obtained from Cristo; he needs Sam to trace the number.  In reply, Sam waggles the bill from his lunch with his F.B.I. buddies, which they insisted he cover.

Sam and Michael meet across the street from the Victor Hotel. Sam has traced the number. Michael asks if it's an employee of the Victor, only to be told it's the hotel owner himself, one Lawrence Henderson. Michael gets his first look at Henderson as a white SUV pulls up in front of the hotel, and the owner and his security detail emerge. Michael asks Sam if the cops ever looked at Henderson for the theft, Sam says that man had an alibi and a pocketful of lawyers to sell it; he was cleared. He adds that a few years back, Henderson owned a club in New Orleans that mysteriously burned down, and the insurance money was used to purchase the Victor. Sam adds that Henderson is paranoid and security conscious.

Taking this news to Fiona's, Michael arrives in time to see her and Thomas engaged in a cookout. Also, Fiona tells him, Thomas is teaching her baseball. Thomas is stunned to learn he was set up by the hotel owner, a man he'd never met. Michael tells Thomas it was nothing personal, he just made an easy fall guy. Thomas wants to go to the cops. Michael points out that all they have is the fact that Michael broke into Cristo's place and exhorted information from him... and rather than arresting Lawrence, he'd have time to ditch the diamond brooch as the cops trot both Michael and Thomas off to prison. Fiona soothes Thomas, assuring him that things will be fine.

"Hard or easy, your choice!" comes a booming voice from the front door. It's Wayne Ray, the huge bounty hunter, and he is intent on getting his man this time. Michael orders Fiona to take Thomas out the back, and asks Wayne if they can talk. Wayne isn't interested, and Michael has his hands full with the big man, who casually shrugs off Michael's carefully aimed kicks and punches.

When you're giving five inches, and a hundred pounds on a well trained opponent, it helps to know the terrain better than he does.

Michael pretends to flee, and Wayne chases him, only to trip on the tiny step leading to the kitchen. Michael grabs Wayne in a choke hold, but the bounty hunter easily flips him over and starts strangling him, demanding to know where Fiona has taken Thomas. As Michael is about to pass out, Fiona doubles back into the house, smashing Ray on the head with one of her precious snow globes, rendering him unconscious. "Italy was one of my favorites," she mourns. Michael thanks her.

Fiona moves Thomas to Michael's place. Though less than thrilled with this turn of events, he can't argue with her logic. Wayne Ray knows where her house is, and a cheap motel is the next place he will look; Michael's apartment it must be. Fiona snuggles next to the fugitive on the mattress on the floor, gently laying her head on his shoulder as she asks Michael to explain the plan to Thomas. It's a simple plan: Michael will pose as a buyer, getting Henderson to bring the brooch out into the open, they will then notify the police, Henderson will be arrested, Thomas will be free. A strange look passes over Michael's face as he watches Fiona gently massage Thomas' shoulders, telling him that they will be celebrating his freedom by the end of the week. Michael calls Fiona away from Thomas under the guise of discussing the plan. He asks her what she is doing. She replies that she is working. Michael counters that this is different, and she knows it. "I didn't know we were in a relationship, Michael." Fiona purrs, turning away to offer Thomas a drink or a yogurt. The strange look is back on Michael's face.

Meeting with Sam, Michael obviously has Fiona on his mind, as Sam tells him that mixing romance and work isn't a good idea, in his opinion. He offers a tidbit about the lady friend, Veronica, telling Michael that just the other day, she had asked him if bullets came in different sizes. "Adorable." Michael mutters, asking Sam if he is going to help with the diamond deal. Sam is in, wanting to know if his role as middleman brokering the meeting should be 'shady international business guy'. Michael nods, adding that Sam is to be extra security conscious, so Henderson will think he can relax his guard a bit. Sam grumbles about having to shave and put on a suit.

A good cover identity is a team effort. If you want to meet someone, it's a good idea to play a little hard to get. Put people between yourself and the target. Make them come to you.

A freshly shaved and immaculately dressed Sam meets Henderson in the hotel bar. Cristo has vouched for "Charles Finley" and Henderson offers a drink of twenty-year-old single malt Scotch, but as a security conscious paranoid, "Charles" has to decline the drink. He tells the tale: he represents an international group of buyers who deal in merchandise that is bought and sold 'quietly', and they have learned that Henderson might have an item of interest. Henderson allows that, while this might be true, he wants to meet the buyer face-to-face, no middleman. 'Charles' thinks this might be impossible, but Henderson insists, adding that he will be happy to meet the buyer at his home, as it is secure. But, he continues, without a direct meeting, there can be no deal.

Sam calls Michael to tell him that plan is in play, and Michael thanks him, adding that he has to go, his Libyan has just arrived. Approaching Anwar, the Libyan operative, quietly in a parking garage, hands held up to indicate he is no threat to the spy, Michael introduces himself, remarking that he'd heard Anwar was in town and just wanted to say 'Hi.' Inspecting Michael, Anwar is incredulous. "You are Westen? I thought you would be taller." Michael explains that he wanted a chance to talk to Anwar. The Libyan replies that he's heard that most people who talk to Michael Westen don't often live to tell about it. Michael promises Anwar that his situation has changed, his own people aren't talking to him, and he needs a bit of help from the other side to help him find out why. He encourages the suspicious spy to not make a hasty judgment, but to ask around, do his homework and arrive at an informed decision, promising that Anwar will have no trouble finding him when he's made a decision. Hands still raised to indicate the lack of a threat, Michael backs away from the operative, leaving quickly.

Arriving back at the apartment, he stops dead at the sight of Fiona and Thomas sharing an intimate bottle of wine. Asking if he's interrupting, Fiona says that Thomas has cooked dinner as a sort of thank you. Thomas tells Michael that he'd made enough for him too, but Fiona interjects that the meal was so good, they had eaten Michael's portion. She asks about the job. Michael announces the plan is in play, and all that is left to do is to get Henderson to bring the brooch out into the open so he can be caught with it in his possession. "So," says Thomas, "I can go home soon?" "Let's hope so." Michael replies, again with that strange look on his face.

Sam and Michael arrive at Henderson's home. Sam is playing chauffeur, Michael riding in the back seat. As they exit the car, both former spies are checking out the heavy security system. "Either he is expecting an armored assault..." begins Sam, "...or he has something to protect." finishes Michael. Introduced to Henderson as 'Mr. Smith', Sam adds that they prefer to conduct business on a less-than-personal level. "Smith' continues, explaining that ordinarily he would never consider showing up in person for an acquisition, but the brooch is reported to be worth the risk. Sam and Michael play off each other well, clearly establishing Michael as the well-respected superior, and Sam as the security-conscious paranoid intent on protecting his boss. 'Smith' and Henderson enter the house, leaving 'Finley' to accept the maid's offer of a drink with "Water will be just great, thank you."

Henderson wants to know how 'Smith' found him. Michael smoothly explains that he has dealt with Cristo previously, confiding that the people Henderson has contacted in Europe are being less than discrete; he adds that if Henderson isn't able to move the brooch soon, he might find himself no longer in possession of it, due to this appalling lack of discretion. They negotiate. Henderson thinks the brooch is worth 2 million, but will accept 1.75 million. Michael chuckles, both negotiate hard, but Michael gets his price by flashing the diamond bracelet he'd lifted from Christo, telling the jewel thief that he'd only paid 50 cents on the dollar. Henderson agrees to 'Smith's' offer of 1.2 million. Michael asks to see the merchandise, and there's an unexpected glitch. Henderson has high quality photos, saving him from having to produce the genuine article.

Just because someone believes you are who you say you are, doesn't mean he'll do what you want him to do.

Dismayed, but thinking fast, Michael agrees to see the brooch when he arrives with the cash, but, still trying to get the item out in the open, insists the transaction take place at an independent lab that will authenticate the brooch. Henderson refuses, the deal must take place at his home. Michael says this condition is a deal-breaker, Henderson replies that as such, they have no deal. So close, but not close enough. The plan will have to be redesigned.

At the apartment, Sam, Michael and Fiona discuss the unexpected turn of events. Michael says that while the hotel owner needs the money, the man thinks it's too much of a risk to move the brooch now. "So, what do we do?" asks Thomas. All three covert operatives stare at him for his use of the word 'we'. Michael suggests that since he's already planted the idea in Henderson's mind that someone might be planning to steal the brooch, they can exploit his paranoia, convincing him that it is riskier to leave the brooch where it is than to move it. They all agree that they can't get into the house. "Christ, this is turning into a full psych-op campaign." grumbles Sam. Thomas is confused, Michael explains that this is psychological warfare; they have to convince the hotel owner that they are a stronger group than they really are. Sam and Fiona are assigned to assess how this can be accomplished, and Michael leaves for a meeting.

Clandestine meetings are never fun to arrange. It's a big part of the job for a covert operative, but it's never pleasant. It's not so much the fear of death that bothers you, it's going to the meet with a bag over your head. Sometimes they wash the bag, sometimes they don't.

Arriving in the parking garage, Michael is shoved into the back seat by three of Anwar's men, and his head is covered by a burlap sack. Arriving at the Libyan hideout, Michael can't resist pointing out that they are missing the ambiance of Miami in their current quarters. Anwar enters, telling Michael that he has verified the fact that Michael has been burned, but wants to know why this should be his concern; he seriously doubts that Michael Westen is asking for a job with the Libyans. Michael lays out his proposal: He suggests a trade, "Your government would like to know who attacked your gas supply depot in Ghadamis in 2002. I have that information."

Anwar, still suspicious, asks why he shouldn't just force that information out of Michael, and then kill him. Michael has a few reasons: "...the info might or might not check out, torture is unreliable - as you know - and then you'd have to deal with Fiona, who put me in touch with you. More trouble than it's worth. Trust me." Appearing to concede the point, Anwar asks Michael what he wants in return. He explains to the Libyan that he needs to reach out to the NSA agent that burned him, one Phillip Cowan. All he'd like in return for the information about the gas depot is for Anwar to mention Philip Cowan as a friend of his when he is certain the Americans are listening. Anwar is baffled, asking what he is supposed to say.  Michael suggest he be creative, perhaps have the head of the Libyan secret police send the man a fruit basket.

He finishes his explanation; Cowan will try to figure out what is going on, and as he connects the dots, he will arrive at Michael Westen, giving Michael what he needs, a chat with the man behind his burn notice. Anwar agrees to consider this, and Michael places the bag over his own head: "I love this part."

The thing about security is that the very things that protect you can be turned against you by someone who knows what he's doing. It's tough to compromise a well thought out security system, but making someone think you can compromise it, well, that's much easier.

After inspecting the surveillance photos taken by Fiona and Sam, the team prepars a series of "psych warfare" moves, beginning with assembling some simple laser pointers.

Take surveillance cameras, for example. You can disable one by shooting a laser at it and overloading the light-sensitive chip. Cheap, easy, and exactly the sort of thing a sophisticated criminal gang, with lots of resources, would do.

A quick stop outside Lawrence's estate as they are driving by, and the cameras aimed at the street are knocked out.

Leave around a few tell-tale signs of surveillance like cigarette butts, a forgotten camera lens cap, and the more security there is, the more likely they are to think they've got a serious problem.

Sam gleefully drops the cigarette butts and lens cap on the perimeter of Henderson's house, all of which are duly located by his security team. There is a finishing touch:

Even the security team itself can be an opportunity. The more employees you have, the more you have to worry about them. Deliver a few vague threats and a few hundred bucks to a security guard; if he's honest, he'll tell his boss, who then wonders who wasn't so honest. For the cost of a nice dinner, you can get a whole security team canned.

Fiona approaches one of Henderson's guys as he arrives at work. She knows his name, and he stops to chat with a lovely woman, who tells him that she's been watching him at work and at his home, and thinks he could use a little help. She hands him an envelope, he unthinkingly accepts it. The psych-op is in full swing.

Sam and Michael meet up, and Sam comments that this job has been more fun than he expected, since he hasn't done a full-blown psych-op "since there was an East Germany." Michael is happy for him. Sam brings up Fiona, wondering if she is really interested in Thomas. Michael has no idea, but points out that Fiona's idea of testing a relationship is "the emotional equivalent of artillery fire". Sam's phone rings. Henderson wants to meet. "Finley" plays hard-to-get, promising he will try to get "Smith back on board, but he can't promise anything, and will call back later. The two spies enjoy a frozen treat while they make the jewel thief sweat.

Michael arrives at the Victor Hotel, approached rapidly by Henderson. "Smith" says his conditions for arranging the sale haven't changed, and Henderson appears to accept this, inviting Michael to a more private spot where they can work out the finer details.

One of the dangers of any kind of psychological warfare, is it can be too effective, and send the target into a paranoid tail-spin. That paranoia can be useful... or deadly.

Sure enough, upon arriving in a closed room, Michael is dismayed to see a beaten and bound Cristo. Knowing Cristo will have talked, he surveys the room quickly, choosing a weapon and an escape plan. Alert but appearing casual, he listens to the hotel owner explain that he'd had security problems at his home. He'd considered and eliminated the Europeans he'd approached about the brooch, but had decided Cristo was the more likely suspect. As Henderson tells 'Smith' that Cristo gave him up, Michael Westen springs into action, grabbing Henderson and the pen simultaneously. Pressing the point to the man's neck, he calmly explains to the security guys who've drawn their guns that a mere five pounds of pressure on their boss' carotid artery will kill him, if the grip on his tie doesn't choke him to death first. Michael orders them to lower their guns, an order echoed by Henderson. Backing toward the exit door, Michael can't resist whispering to Henderson that a human shield is much less effective if he goes limp, making him dead weight and hard to drag around. The security team follows our spy, but the attempt is futile. Michael Westen is gone.

Thomas is in hysterics back at the apartment, stunned that Michael was nearly killed. He believes the plan is ruined, Henderson knows who Michael is now. Michael corrects him; the jewel thief knows only that 'Smith' isn't who he said he was - big difference. He points out that Henderson still believes he's going to be ripped off, still thinks his security is compromised, and will still have to move the brooch. All they need now is to figure out where he will take the diamond. Thomas wants to know how they could possibly know this. "I've got some friends." Michael states.

Sam meets up with Barry again. Barry has the requested information, and asks about payment up front. Laughing, Sam hands over the diamond bracelet Michael stole earlier, adding it's with compliments from Cristo. Barry is pleased, it's payment and payback all at once. He tells Sam that Henderson has several bank accounts, but only one of the banks has a safe deposit operation, and it's the best in Miami. Barry is certain Henderson will take the brooch to this location.

At the parking garage to meet the Libyans, Michael pre-empts the operatives by putting himself in the back seat of the car, asking if the bag is completely necessary. Anwar himself is in the driver's seat, making eye contact with Michael via the rear view mirror. He tells Michael that they are interested in the information about the gas depot job. Michael asks about Phillip Cowan, the Libyan tells him that arrangements are being made. Michael turns over the information needed to identify the team that did the damage, adding "Don't be gentle on them. They hurt a lot of innocent people." Anwar notes that the secret police in his country aren't noted for their gentleness. He offers Michael a job if he can't resolve his situation, Michael replies he's flattered, but has somewhere else to be.

With the problem of the burn notice taken to the next step, Michael returns to complete the job of proving Thomas' innocence.

The key to good security is good systems, consistency. But those very systems make you predictable. Where will you take your valuables? A bank you trust. How are you going to get there? With armed men in a big SUV. When will you go? When the bank is the least crowded. All good procedure, all 100% predictable.

Michael watches the SUV pull away from Henderson's house, and calls to let Sam and Fiona know their target is on the way.

Sam is set up in a high location at the bank. Hearing from Michael that the SUV should be there in about five minutes, he pulls out his cell phone and dials 911. Whispering, he represents himself as a terrified bank customer who is inside Dade Trust, which is being robbed, and hangs up quickly.

If you know someone is going to be at a bank at a particular time, it's not too hard to make it look like they are really robbing the bank. Shoot out a few surveillance cameras... (Sam does this) Block off the street with a stolen car like they're preparing an escape route... (Fiona's assignment) Fire up a spark-gap transmitter to kill the security radios at the bank... (Sam again) and they really look like they know what they are doing.

As Henderson's SUV pulls up, he suspects this is 'Smith's' attempt to rob him. Answering his phone, he tells 'Smith' that he is too late, and laughs. Michael asks him if he is sure, and suggests he look up. Sam makes sure his gun is visible. Henderson's security force hears their boss yell "Gun!" and they pull their own weapons, just as the police arrive. With the phone still to his ear, Henderson hears Michael say: "You'll like prison, Lawrence. They've got a lot of cool security systems." Michael watches from the corner as the police frisk Henderson, predictably finding the missing diamond brooch. Fiona strolls casually up to Michael. "All this to clear the name of an innocent man. That's noble. You should be proud." she says, turning to look at him. The strange look reappears on Michael's face as he says softly, "You know who I did this for, Fi." He walks away. A triumphant look crosses her face, and she hurries to catch up to him.

Wayne Ray pulls into a parking lot where Fiona is reclining on the hood of Michael's Charger. He demands to know what she wants. She tells him that since he's reported her for aiding and abetting, she's having trouble getting work. She hands over a presumably cuffed Thomas, asking if Ray would be willing to split the bounty. He grabs Thomas, telling Fiona not to expect his check. He asks her why she turned McKee in. Fiona replies that Thomas had offered to pay them off, but his check had bounced. Wayne Ray sarcastically tells Fiona that she is all heart. Fiona watches as Ray calls his boss, enjoying the look on the huge man's face when he hears that Thomas McKee is no longer a wanted man. Thomas laughs as well, pulling his hands apart to show that he was never cuffed, Fiona had put one flexi-cuff around each wrist, and he'd merely held them together to complete Ray's humiliation.

Thomas is packing to leave, trying to be chatty with Michael, who is brusque. The former spy's phone rings, and he hears an unfamiliar voice say "You think this is funny?" "Who is this?" Michael asks. "This is Phillip Cowan." Michael is pleased, "Nice to finally hear your voice." Cowan is enraged: "You want to tell me what the head of the Libyan secret police is doing sending me a FRUIT BASKET? I got the FBI on my front lawn!" The NSA agent is screaming, and for the first time, Michael shows some emotion of his own: "Yeah? Well, welcome to my world. I'm just getting started. I'd love to see what we can get the North Koreans to send you. Or Hezbollah, and it doesn't stop until you tell me why I was burned. I was set up and I want to know why." Hearing only silence, Michael calls his name: "Phil?" The desired answer is given: "I'll be in touch. Count on it."

Fiona and Michael drop Thomas off, listening to him explain with excitement that, while he has to appear in court to explain a few things, his lawyer says his case looks great. Michael advises him dryly to show up for court this time. Thomas offers Fiona an envelope, adding that $8,000.00 doesn't seem like much in return for what they'd done for him. Fiona replies that Thomas is sweet, accepting the cash, and thanking him for the money. The strange look is back on Michael's face, and he abruptly walks to the Charger, opening the trunk. Thomas leans in to kiss Fiona, who turns her face away. Confused, he looks to Michael for help, but Michael is thoroughly occupied by something in the trunk. Fiona completes her brush-off of Thomas by reminding him that it's possible not every bounty hunter in Miami got the memo that he was no longer wanted, and Thomas walks away.

Michael slams the trunk lid closed and approaches Fiona. "I got you something, too." he says softly, bringing a snow globe from behind his back. Frolicking dolphins are in the globe, and the base has a familiar message: Welcome To Miami. He watches her intently as she examines the gift, flinching as she gives it a vigorous shake right into his face. He opens the car door for her, and the couple drive away together.

CastEdit

MainEdit

RecurringEdit

GuestsEdit

TriviaEdit

  • Although Sharon Gless is credited in this episode, she does not appear in this episode.
  • Sam chooses the cover name "Charles Finley" in this episode. Charles Finley was the flamboyant and often controversial owner of the Kansas City Athletics, later to be known as the Oakland Athletics after moving the franchise.
  • Michael says he prefers to meet with Fiona's Libyan contacts rather than her Iranian ones; Marshall Manesh, the actor who plays Anwar, is in fact Iranian by birth.

Continuity ErrorsEdit

Around Wikia's network

Random Wiki